Tenkara Fly Fishing along the Albemarle Sound

tenkara fly fishing albemarle soundA gentleman fishing one of the local creeks last fall quickly caught my attention. I was returning from an afternoon of paddling and fishing on Queen Anne Creek. When I returned to the dock, the angler was enjoying one of many catches using a traditional fly rod. Colin introduced himself and then laughed as he joked that he had come out to test some of his hand tied flies. The combination of the angler’s joy, art and skill intrigued me. A few weeks later, I tried my own luck with fly fishing albeit a centuries old technique called Tenkara.

This simple form of fly fishing originated from Japan over two hundred years ago and is still one of the most popular Japanese fresh water angling today. Simple is fine with me especially when it comes to gear and equipment — think rod, line and fly – no reel! Here’s a quick Tenkara lesson for fishing fresh water streams on the fly along the Albemarle Sound.

Tenkara beginnings

Traditional Japanese rods are made from solid bamboo. Modern tenkara rods are constructed from ultra light, high-tech carbon fiber. Rods vary in length from 8.5 feet to 13 feet and anglers can easily cast lines from 12’–30′ or longer. One of the great advantages of the tenkara rods is that they are telescopic and conveniently break down into the rod’s butt section. The rod “telescopes” out of the largest section of the rod and quickly sets up in seconds. My Patagonia rod’s length is 10’6” but packs into its 20.5” base section. I can easily carry my rod and fishing kit with me while cycling or walking to local creeks.

Tenkara 101

Tenkara rods have a tag of line called a lilian that adjoins the tip of the rod. A level line (fly line) of various lengths (twenty-foot, twelve-foot, eight-foot) is slipped over and hitched to the lilian utilizing a turle knot. This allows quick transition to longer/shorter lines in the field. Finally, a 4’–6’ tippet is tied to the fly line and the fly. Lately, I’ve been averaging about 20-24 feet of total casting line.

Once I arrive at the stream, I simply unwind my desired length of line, gently pull out the tip section, seat with the adjoining section until I’ve properly set the entire rod. I chose the 10’6” model for it’s springy action and all-around length for fishing coastal creeks with dry flies, soft hackles and streamers.

Fly Fishing on Queen Anne Creek

Different strokes

Most folks who experience the rhythm of Tenkara use words like “intuitive, FUN and instinctive” when describing the feel of casting and setting the hook. I prefer to move the rod quickly back to a vertical point then release the rod forward to approximately 10 o’clock. This allows your line to move forward and present the fly toward your target. I place my index finger on top of the handle for better control. Instead of moving my wrist to create a twitching motion on the fly, I gently squeeze my smallest two fingers on the cork handle. The flexible tip gently reacts to the squeeze and transfers a subtle motion to the fly. The majority of my strikes emerge while I’m retrieving the line to make another cast.

Tenkara fishing Albemarle SoundCompared to conventional fly fishing, the tip of the rod is held relatively high after the cast. This keeps a tighter line making it easier to set the hook. When I land a fish, I casually raise the rod up higher and calmly reach for the line. Fishing with longer line requires one to tilt the rod back, keeping your arm low and close to the body when recovering the line. With larger catches, use the line versus the rod to lift the fish out of the water. After securing the line, I often lay the rod down on the ground or dock and use both hands to reel the line in. Again, this technique seems fairly natural after a couple of successful landings. Since November, I’ve been routinely catching bluegill, black perch and yellow perch in the shallow, grassy waters of Queen Anne Creek and Pembroke Creek.

While some traditionalists or fisher elitists may scoff at the Tenkara fly fishing method, I’ve found it very exciting and effective for anglers of all ages and abilities. When you combine elegance, art and recreation, it’s all good! Some guides are finding it to be a great introduction and teaching tool to fly fishing. Regardless of your preference, share the love of fishing and fish on!




Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge

tundra swans at Lake Mattamuskeet NWR

waveLINKS birding category

A visit to North Carolina’s largest natural lake has been on my ‘to-do’ list for nearly twenty-five years. I’ve read about the history of the lodge, the world-class birding and wildlife as well as the excellent outdoor recreation options. Last month, my wife and I took a day-trip to Lake Mattamuskeet and we instantly discovered it was well worth the wait.

Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge is located on the Albemarle-Pamlico Peninsula and encompasses 50,180 acres of water, forest, marsh, and open fields. The shallow lake, which averages a depth of only two feet, covers approximately 40,000 acres. The surrounding marshes and woodlands provide habitat, cover and food for more than 200 species of birds. November through January is the prime season for bird watching considering the fact that over 12,000 ducks, geese, swans, herons, bitterns and other waterfowl winter on the refuge’s grounds.

The US Fish & Wildlife Service has a comprehensive conservation and resource management plan for the refuge that includes water management for waterfowl, shorebirds and fisheries; cooperative farming; prescribed burning and deer management with public hunting. Through the preservation of wetlands and habitat, they also protect and conserve migratory birds and other wildlife. Education, interpretation and community partnerships are also vital strategies that the refuge implements. The Annual Wings Over Water Festival in October is a stellar example of how our national wildlife refuges successfully collaborate with local communities.

Great Egret Mattamuskeet NWR

Great Egret observed along the Wildlife Drive

 Seasonal activities

Whether you’re walking or driving, a number of trails, roads and levies provide excellent wildlife viewing opportunities. During the winter, the refuge management restricts access to some roads and levees from November 1 – February 28. However, approximately eight miles of levees and 12 miles of road are open year-round. Boating, canoeing and kayaking are not allowed during the winter. Check with management at the refuge headquarters for additional information about refuge regulations, restricted areas and permitted hunts.

The Hwy 94 causeway, Wildlife Drive and the refuge entrance road offer premier birding opportunities. The observation platform along Hwy 94 affords a panoramic view over the lake. The New Holland Boardwalk Trail along East Canal Drive provides convenient access to a cypress swamp and marshland. Also, there’s a trailhead kiosk, photo blind and benches for photography and observation.

Mattamuskeet Lodge

Mattamuskeet Lodge – originally a pump station

My wife and I took advantage of a beautiful January day and visited the refuge. We enjoyed the exhibits inside the Visitors Center and the grounds adjacent to the Mattamuskeet Lodge. This facility was originally built as a pumping station designed to drain the lake into productive farmland. Eventually, the project proved to be too costly and impractical. Three decades later the U.S. Government acquired the land and the refuge was established in 1934. The lodge and surrounding acres have been transferred to the NC Wildlife Resources Commission. Efforts to secure funding and restore the lodge, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, are currently being planned.

American coots at Mattamuskeet NWR

American Coots – Mattamuskeet NWR

Further adventures

While touring Wildlife Drive, we stopped at several locations to observe Tundra Swans, Great Egrets, Northern Pintails, American Coots and White Ibises probing for food in the shallow waters. Several groups of birders and photographers were lined along the banks taking advantage of the splendid views.

Our first exploration to Lake Mattamuskeet turned out to be a sneak peek but a real treat and a good overview of the refuge, trails, facilities and access points. With spring in the forecast, we plan to return and explore the refuge in our canoe, skiff or on our bikes – maybe all of the above!

map of Mattamuskeet NWR

Map data by ©OpenStreetMap & contributors

Directions: Mattamuskeet NWR is located approximately 70 miles east of Washington in Hyde County, North Carolina. The headquarters entrance road is located off Hwy 94 1.5 miles north of U.S. 264 between Swan Quarter and Engelhard.


Edenton Observes Martin Luther King, Jr. Day


Dr. Alisa Robinson McLean, the Area Superintendent for Durham County Public Schools was the keynote speaker at the 2016 birthday celebration of Martin Luther King, Jr. An enthusiast crowd of approximately 500 people attended the event held at Swain Auditorium in Edenton, NC. Nearly 100 of those attending were students. Several community leaders spoke passionately about MLK’s legacy, his impact on their own lives and how his dedication to service continues to inspire future generations. The celebration of MLK’s birthday featured a poem recited by a local fourth grade student, a prayer from Bishop Landon Mason, music by the Judah Arts Community Youth Ensemble and a closing civil rights hymn, We Shall Overcome.

The tribute was hosted by the Chowan County Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Committee. This year’s theme was galvanized in part by a paper King had written in 1947 while a student at Morehouse College. King wrote, “We must remember that intelligence is not enough. Intelligence plus character–that is the goal of true education.”

Martin Luther King’s Legacy Inspires Locals


Dr. Alisa Robinson McLean, who grew up in Elizabeth City, NC offered an energizing speech influenced by her personal reflection of King’s legacy. She challenged all generations to ask what King cited as one of life’s most persistent and urgent questions, “What are you doing for others?”

Please don’t let that day be ‘a day off’ for you; but rather ‘a day on’ for service to your fellow man.

This call for action echoed across the country as other communities celebrated King’s contributions through a national day of service. And consistent with King’s teachings, Dr. McLean affirmed that the time is always right to do the right thing. These same sentiments that King presented at the height of the civil rights movement are still remarkably relevant fifty years later!

McLean summarized her speech articulating that King’s life and legacy was grounded on vigorous action – as much about what he did as what he said. May we honor Martin Luther King’s memory by being courageous, insightful, helpful, positive and intentional!

Local Knowledge: Martin Luther King, Jr. first visited Edenton on December 20, 1962. He spoke to approximately 500 people. He also delivered a speech at an All Citizens Freedom Rally at the local armory in Edenton, NC on May 8, 1966.




Dog Friendly along the Albemarle Sound


Winter often ushers in a season of nor’ easterly winds, dreary days and sub-freezing temperatures. Here in Eastern NC, we also have lovely stretches of milder weather. And those of us who own dogs are certainly glad to have several pet-friendly options available to us when the forecasts are favorable. Here’s a winter sampling of all things dog friendly along the Albemarle Sound.

Parks, trails and wagging tails

There are endless opportunities for dog friendly outings along the Albemarle Sound and Outer Banks. From county parks and multi-use trails to National Seashores and waterfront boardwalks. Many towns and parks encourage a pet welcoming environment. Some accommodate pet owners with user-friendly pet waste stations, dog-friendly parks and courtesy fountains for canines.

I live in the very pet friendly town of Edenton, NC. I recently walked my dog Harper with my friend Doug and his dog Wanda. I was talking to him about how friendly our town was and he quickly smiled and added, “The dogs are nice too!” We both met several months ago while walking our dogs in Queen Anne Park. Several of the small parks, neighborhoods and open spaces along Edenton Bay and the Edenton Cotton Mill Village offer ideal dog walking opportunities with convenient waste stations, open space and beautiful views of the bay. Unfortunately, there are no off-leash parks in the region of the Albemarle Sound. If you’re looking at scouting out new parks and facilities, be sure to check their rules and regulations and obey all leash laws. Some parks have restricted seasons when dogs are not allowed so it’s best to do a little research before you and Fido head out to a new place.


Dog lovers and explorers

Traveling around the sound, I’ve discovered several parks in the region that are dog friendly. Nags Head Woods Preserve offers several designated dog-friendly trails of various lengths including the Roanoke, Discovery, Town and ADA Trails. The town of Kitty Hawk operates the year-round Sandy Run Park, which adjoins the two-mile Paul Pruitt Multi-Use Path along The Woods Rd. Together, their trails and paths offer an extended winter outing for your family, friends and canine. My wife and I have a hyperactive chocolate lab so we recently took Harper out along the half-mile boardwalk at Sandy Run then ventured out on the paved multi-use path for an additional two miles. The paved trail is generally sheltered from coastal winds and there’s parking and restrooms available at Sandy Run Park.


Canines on the coast

The beaches along the Outer Banks become less restrictive for pets during the off season so be sure to consider the seventy-plus miles of open beaches during your next mild winter outing. Most beach towns and public beaches still require leashes and in most cases, leashes which are not longer than 6 feet. The Outer Banks Visitors Bureau provides a comprehensive one-stop resource concerning dog-friendly beaches and town regulations for visitors to the OBX.

North Carolina State Parks provide pet-friendly facilities as well. Jockey’s Ridge in Nags Head and Pettigrew State Park along the shorelines of Lake Phelps both allow leashed pets.

dog friendly along the albemarle sound

Finally, our own National Parks celebrate their 100th anniversary this year! The park service permits dogs year-round (must always be restricted to a 6’ leash and designated swim beaches excluded) so load up your dogs when you travel along Cape Hatteras National Seashore. Last month, I was pleasantly surprised to find a handy pet fountain during our last canine adventure to the Bodie Island Visitor Center and Lighthouse.


Fore more dog friendly info, visit our interactive map and use our category filter “dog-friendly” to browse more resources including lodging, pet supply stores and restaurants who love dogs. Have fun, be safe and enjoy all the dog-friendly retreats along the sound!

What’s in Your Doggie Bag? Be sure to pack treats, toys, water, bowl, waste bags and a towel. Always be courteous to others and pick up/dispose of waste. Make sure your pet is wearing a secure collar, I.D. and registration tag. You’ll be set for your next excursion.







waveLINKS things to do…


As the dawn of the traditional New Year approaches, it’s time to start the year anew and scout out some options for winter’s long voyage. Here’s waveLINKS’ 2016 first quarter roundup of things to do – from a first day hike of the year to a beer fest and more! Indoors or out in the wild, there’s plenty of events, outings, art exhibits and winter workshops going on along the Albemarle Sound and beyond!


First Step into the New Year

North Carolina State Parks will be hosting 1st Day Hikes to start the year off right. Join the staff at Merchant’s Millpond State Park for a 2.5-mile hike along the Lassiter and Bennett’s Creek Trail. Hikers will be rewarded with hot chocolate, cookies and natural treats like bird watching. What a great way to start the year off on a healthy note! Friday, January 1, 2016; 12pm. Pettigrew State Park will also bring in the New Year with hikes along the trails at Phelps Lake. Click here for more info on First Day Hikes.



Road Trip! Eastern NC Brew Fest & New Craft Brewery!

Grab a friend and take the year’s first road trip to the 6th Annual Jolly Skull Beer & Wine Festival in Greenville, NC. Sample over 125 craft beers and regional wines. All proceeds benefit the Beer Army Foundation. January 23; 2:30 – 6 pm at the Greenville Convention Center. Online tickets.

trollingwoodtaproom&brewerySpeaking of Greenville, for years it was one of the largest cities in North Carolina NOT to have a brewery. Not any more thanks in part to two childhood friends and an East Carolina brewer who recently joined forces to open Trollingwood Brewery & Taproom. The guys preserved a 90-year old building on Dickinson Avenue. The restored building features 2000 square feet of brewing and taproom space including a brew house floor and long bar with plenty of open seating. Other amenities include convenient on-site parking and a roomy outdoor patio. According to their website, Trollingwood’s brewer, Grayson William’s “brewing background is geared towards developing traditional yet innovative American style ales while using local ingredients whenever possible.” He has perfected four staple brews as well as a lineup of rotating seasonals.



Art for the Ages and All Stages!

The 38th Annual Frank Stick Memorial Art Show is one of the Outer Banks most established fine art exhibitions. Frank Stick was a national renowned illustrator who produced work and cover art for Field and StreamOutdoor America, Colliers, Sports Afield and The Saturday Evening Post. His influence on the Outer Banks as a preservationist and artist made him an obvious choice for the arts council’s first full-fledged, annual exhibition – and one that remains the longest running visual arts exhibit in Dare County.

The exhibition reception will be held Saturday, January 30, from 6p.m. – 8p.m. The exhibition, sponsored by the Dare County Arts Council in Manteo, NC runs through February 27.

Pocosin Arts Albemarle Sound

Share the love of art with younger students at the After School Arts at Pocosin Arts in Columbia, NC. The Session Three series (February 23rd – March 31st) features two exceptional classes.

Ceramics class for all grades meets every Tuesday from 3:30-5:30 pm. Students will have fun learning to work with clay with resident artist, Matt Repsher. Techniques in constructing sculptural objects and fundamentals of wheel throwing will be taught. Participants will use color and surface decoration through texture, glazing and firing as their final steps to create their own unique piece of work.

The Jewelry/Metals Class (Grades 6th – 9th) meets every Thursday from 3:30-5:30 pm. Resident artist, Phil Ambrose will introduce students to the fascinating world of working with metal.  Students will learn introductory skills using a jeweler’s handsaw; create texture with a hammer, rolling mill and other tools. They will also learn to connect elements together with rivets and soldering.  Finally, they will learn how to patina copper in a range of colors from a rich brown to black to enhance their unique sculptures and jewelry.

Food, Drink, Fun and more!


Taste of the Beach

The Outer Banks Restaurant Association presents the popular event which features four days of food, drink, fun and festivities. This year’s festival includes beer pairings, wine tastings, cooking classes, special multi-course menu presentations, brewery tours, tapas crawls, cook-offs, showdowns and progressive dinners. Over 40 participating venues and nearly 50 events along the Outer Banks showcase the innovative culinary opportunities and talents of the region’s creative chefs. March 17 – 20, 2016. Info & tickets.

Kelly’s Running of the Leprechauns 10K

No excuses! Now is the time to jumpstart your training and get back in shape just in time for the Kelly’s 8th Annual Running of the Leprechauns 10K. The 6.2-mile race will be held on Saturday March 12, 2016. The course begins at Kelly’s Restaurant at 2316 S. Croatan Hwy. (10.5 Milepost) in Nags Head. All net proceeds benefit the Outer Banks Community Foundation. March 13, 2016

Here’s to a happy and healthy New Year from all of us at Connecting Corridors!



Autumn Solitude on Bodie Island


We’re still on our fall discovery tour and taking advantage of good weather and fewer crowds. I call this the “edge effect” which occurs between two seasons. I’ve sneaked in some of my best adventures during these opportunistic times. I’m back on the road and trail and this time I’m exploring Cape Hatteras National Seashore. In 1953, Congress protected this coastal resource, which was designated as being natural and recreational significant to preserve forever. Cape Hatteras National Seashore is administered by the National Park Service, which preserves and protects the windswept seacoast stretching nearly 80 miles. The seashore spans north to south across three islands – Bodie, Hatteras and Ocracoke.

Seasonal Notes

Cape Hatteras National Seashore is open year-round although facilities, programs and activities change with the seasons. For example, the three lighthouses along these islands are not open for climbing after Columbus Day and don’t reopen until the third Friday in April 2016. Cape Point Campground located on Cape Hatteras, is the only National Park Service campground open during the fall through the end of November.

So during the off-season, I’ve personally found you give up a few perks offered during summer’s peak season including interpretive programs but you end up with rewarding self-guided and intimate adventures.

Editor’s note: The Ocracoke Island Lighthouse is not open for climbing year round. Only base tours are available during the summer.


Accessible Adventures

One of the first points of interest on the northern section of the Cape Hatteras National Seashore is the Bodie Island Visitor Center & Lighthouse. It is located off of NC 12 between Nags Head and the Oregon Inlet approximately eight miles south of Whalebone Junction (US 158 and US 64 intersection).

From the parking lot in front of the lighthouse, visitors can conveniently discover a variety of habitats including open fields, remote wetlands, maritime forests, salt marshes, beaches and dunes. During a recent trip, the only visitors I observed were wildlife photographers, birders and birds. According to the NC Birding Trail, late fall and early winter is the perfect time to observe wading birds and numerous waterfowl species which migrate and/or winter along Hatteras.

The wildlife trail from the parking area leads visitors along a half-mile boardwalk to an observation deck that overlooks an expansive freshwater pond. The last day of October, I observed Horned Grebes, Northern Shovelors, several Black Scoters, and a Tri-colored Heron feeding among the cordgrass.


American Black Ducks – Bodie Island

Another wildlife area to explore begins at the gravel road near the south end of the parking lot. A gated service road extends out to a tidal creek and a dock owned by a private hunting club. Anglers are often seen fishing this local creek from the dock and small skiffs. I enjoyed watching two fly fisherman or “water whippers” roll casting along the edge of the bank.

Visitors often see marsh rabbits, turtles, crabs along the creek and marshlands. Occasionally, one can hear the short series of clacking sounds from the Clapper Rail but seldom do hikers get a chance to view this large rail species– one that locals refer to as a marsh hen or mud chicken. Both of the walks reward the hiker with wide open vistas, wildlife viewing and of course, strategic views of the 170’ lighthouse.

Bodie Island can be enjoyed as a brief stopover or a half-day excursion. Binoculars are recommended to get up close and personal with our feathered friends. Also, be sure to check the local hunting season scheduled during the fall/winter. The Bodie Island Lighthouse is open daily, 9am to 5pm, September – May; 9am to 6pm. Oh yeah, act like a local and be sure to pronounce Bodie correctly (Body).






Cycle NC Ride Returns to Edenton in 2016

2016 Cycle NC Coastal Ride Edenton, NC


Online registration for the exciting 3-day cycling event begins October 24, 2015. Here’s a press release on the event:

Cycle NC Coastal Ride
Edenton, NC
April 22-24, 2016

DURHAM, N.C. (September 10, 2015) – North Carolina Amateur Sports announced that the thirteenth annual Cycle North Carolina Coastal Ride will return to Edenton, NC on April 22-24, 2016. Cycling routes of varying lengths from 5 miles to 100 miles will be offered to celebrate the start of the spring cycling season.

Edenton will host the Coastal Ride for the fifth time, allowing participants to camp along the waterfront in downtown or inside at the armory. Many other participants will fill the hotels, bed and breakfast inns and vacation homes for the weekend.

cycling events albemarle sound edenton

photo courtesy of Kip Shaw Photography

The fun-filled weekend will offer three days of cycling and feature some great Coastal Carolina food, music and festivities. The CNC Coastal Ride will also include many off-the-bike recreational activities in the Edenton area. Canoeing, kayaking, bird watching, historic tours, boat rides and beautiful sunsets will fill time away from the bike and provide the participants with many different ways to experience what Edenton has to offer.

The Coastal Ride has set a participation record every year since 2011. Participation has grown from just over 1,000 cyclists to over 1,400 in that time. Edenton was the host for the inaugural Coastal Ride, where 550 cyclists participated. Click here for more info.



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