Lighthouses along the Outer Banks From Currituck to Ocracoke

4 Photos of Outer Banks LighthousesWhat a great time to plan a North Carolina OBX lighthouse tour. Here’s a pocket guide to four lighthouses perched along the Outer Banks. The tour spans more than 118 miles across three barrier islands. Most of the two-lane drive includes 82-miles on the Outer Banks National Scenic Byway. Highlights abound including the Cape Hatteras National Seashore, two national wildlife refuges, a state ferry ride, about a dozen coastal villages and four historic lighthouses. Please don’t try doing it in one day but instead, savor the experience and take in all the sights, sounds and scenes along the Outer Banks.

Spring at Currituck Beach Lighthouse

North of Whalebone Junction

Whalebone Junction is an Outer Banks landmark in Nags Head, NC where three major highways intersect. NC 12 links the three islands of the Outer Banks and all four lighthouses. Cape Hatteras National Seashore begins just south of the junction. We start our lighthouse journey 36 miles north in Historic Corolla Village.

The 162’ unpainted brick Currituck Beach Lighthouse was completed in 1795 and was the final station constructed along the Outer Banks. It was strategically built to guide vessels through the “dark spot” of the Atlantic that existed from Bodie Island to the Cape Henry Lighthouse in Virginia. You don’t have to climb the lighthouse to enjoy the experience. Take a stroll along the lighthouse station and admire the grounds, the Victorian Lighthouse Keeper’s house and the smaller “keeper’s” house, which was moved to the property in 1920. It now serves as the lighthouse station’s museum and gift shop. Admission to grounds and parking are free. There’s a $10 fee to climb the lighthouse tower. Click here for more info.

bodieislandlighthouse

Cape Hatteras National Seashore

Bodie Island Light Station is located off of NC 12 between Nags Head and the Oregon Inlet approximately eight miles south of Whalebone Junction (US 158 and US 64 intersection).

The “climbing” season opens the third Friday in April and continues through Columbus Day. Reward yourself after the strenuous climb with the towering views of the sound, surf and sea. Visitors can also conveniently discover a variety of habitats including open fields, remote wetlands, maritime forests, salt marshes, beaches and dunes. The wildlife trail from the parking area leads visitors along a half-mile boardwalk to an observation deck that overlooks an expansive freshwater pond. Climbing tickets: $8 adults/ $4 senior citizens (62 or older), & children (11 and under, and at least 42″ tall). More info.

Sign welcoming visitors to Cape Hatteras Light Station

Cape Hatteras Lighthouse

Cape Hatteras Lighthouse is located approximately 47.5 miles south of Whalebone Junction on Hatteras Island in the town of Buxton, NC.

In 1990, Cape Hatteras Lighthouse was moved nearly 1,500 feet from the eroding shoreline to its present site. In 1999, other facilities also had to be relocated including the Oil House, two cisterns, double keepers’ quarters and principal keeper’s quarters.

The lighthouse, standing 208′ ft. over the treacherous Diamond Shoals, is the world’s tallest and one of the most popular sites on Hatteras Island. Each year, more than 175,000 visitors climb the 257 steps to the top of the 1870 lighthouse.

Self-guided climbs are available from the 3rd Friday in April to Columbus Day in October. Climbing tickets: $8/adults and $4/senior citizens (62 or older) & children (11 and under, and at least 42″ tall), and the disabled. Tickets are available on a first come, first served basis and can only be purchased in-person at the site the day of the climb. (252) 995-4474. Click here for more info.

ocracokelighthouse

Ocracoke Lighthouse

The final leg of the tour includes an adventurous 36-mile ride south of Cape Hatteras Lighthouse and a 45-minute ferry which connects Hatteras Island with Ocracoke Island. The 1823 Ocracoke Lighthouse is located in Ocracoke Village at the southern end of Cape Hatteras National Seashore. The 75’ solid white lighthouse is the second oldest operating lighthouse in the U.S. and is open daily (It is not open for climbing). There is limited parking so most visitors walk or bike to the lighthouse. More info.

The lighthouse tour can be enjoyed over a long weekend or extended into multiple seasons. Like they say around here, “Whatever floats your boat?” Complete the OBX Lighthouse Bucket List at your own pace and create your own personal Outer Banks adventure. To learn more about these OBX treasures and other lighthouses in the region, please visit our interactive map and select “lighthouses” category.

Lighthouse Guide to the Outer Banks

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Currituck Sound Country Almanac Southern Shores to Corolla

Audubon’s Pine Island Sanctuary and CenterLast weekend, we were cheerfully saying goodbye to winter as we traveled on the edge of the continent along North Carolina’s Outer Banks. It felt like we were threading the eye of the needle as we headed north on Hwy 12 from Southern Shores. The road snaked along the razor-thin barrier island. A stretch of highway past Duck disclosed a sliver of constantly shifting land with less than a 1000’ beam from sound-to-sea. Most of our previous OBX adventures have taken us south along Cape Hatteras National Seashore. Today, my wife and I were day-tripping to Corolla for a hike through the Pine Island Audubon Sanctuary and Center. We were also going to get a sneak peek of Historic Corolla before the upcoming tourism season arrives. For now, this shoulder season was the perfect time to beat the crowds, discover Corolla and spend a wonderful spring-like day shooting the breeze.

As the coordinator for Your Pocket Guide to the Albemarle Sound, I’ve been extensively exploring the region the past couple of years discovering unique, one-of-a-kind places and experiences. I’ve skiffed skinny creeks, visited NC Century farms, cycled back roads, hitched ferries, toured breweries and browsed regional art galleries. One of the most challenging feats has been collecting a cache of local hiking trails. This region of the sounds where land merges with water has plenty of blueways, intra-coastal waterways, open seas and coastal rivers but unfortunately, there are very few off-pavement hiking or walking trails. So my wife and I were extremely excited to learn about the 2.5-mile (5-mile out and back) nature trail at Audubon’s Pine Island Sanctuary and Center.

Observation Platform at Audubon Pine Island Nature Trail

A Delicate Balance

North Carolina’s first Audubon Center is located on the northern end of the Outer Banks in Corolla. The sanctuary maintains a balanced resource management philosophy guided by conservation, education, research, habitat restoration and hunting. The public can enjoy sections of the 2,600-acre sanctuary and participate in spring and summer kayak tours and educational programs offered by the center. The 2.5-mile nature trail is open to the public and can be enjoyed year-round. Parking for the trail is located behind the Pine Island Racquet & Fitness Center.

The trail follows a dirt road from Pine Island to Duck and traverses through a variety of marine evergreen forests. Immediately, visitors will notice the gnarly, twisted canopy of live oaks. The wide roadbed offers excellent birding opportunities along the way. A wildlife observation platform is located one mile from the trailhead and at the end of the trail. Each platform provides excellent views of the sound, forests, marshes and creeks on Pine Island. Wildlife photographers will enjoy the photo blinds that enable up close and intimate sightings of migratory waterfowl and aquatic wildlife. Be sure to bring a pair of binoculars to extend your viewing opportunities to include the extensive marshland, duck blinds (29 total in the sanctuary), ponds and open sound. My wife and I enjoyed watching an Osprey munching on a large fish while it was precariously perched in a red bay shrub along Baum’s Creek and Yankee Pond. We also casually observed a few black ducks, a pair of grebes and a belted kingfisher from the platforms. A variety of songbirds were seen flitting above the shrub and canopy along the trail.

Trail notes: Leashed pets are permitted on the trail. Bring water for your dog if you decide to hike the entire trail. We found March to be an ideal time to experience the trail. Because the trail runs along an open road with very little shade, hiking in warmer weather might be best enjoyed in the cooler times of the day.

Whalehead Club with Currituck Beach Lighthouse

Historic Corolla

After our midday hike, we continued north for nine miles to visit Historic Corolla and Currituck Heritage Park. When we stepped out of our Subaru, it was like stepping back into time. The open park-like setting of Corolla Heritage Park unveiled the picturesque backdrop of the Whalehead Club.

Constructed nearly a century ago, the Art Nouveau mansion stands sentinel above the Currituck Sound and the 39-acre park. The 21,000 square foot structure was built in 1925 by the northern industrialist Edward Wright and his wife Louise. They also owned more than four miles of coastal property developed as a hunt club along the northern end of the island. The grand home served as their winter residence until 1928. The property changed ownership several times over the years. It is now owned by Currituck County and is managed by the county’s Travel and Tourism Department. The beautifully restored residence is listed on the National Register of Historic Places and is open for tours and events.

We continued our self-guided tour of the park down to Point Lawn to take in a soundside perspective of the club. We were quickly rewarded with a splendid view of Currituck Beach Lighthouse towering above the elegant canary-yellow mansion by the sea.

Currituck Beach Light Station

As we walked the half-mile back to the lighthouse grounds, we let our eyes slowly scroll up the 162’ unpainted brick Currituck Beach Lighthouse. The lighthouse was completed in 1795 and was the final station built along the Outer Banks. It was strategically built to guide vessels through the “dark spot” of the Atlantic that existed from Bodie Island to the Cape Henry lighthouse in Virginia. Although the lighthouse was closed for the season, we enjoyed strolling outside the property admiring the grounds, the Victorian Lighthouse Keeper’s house and a smaller “keeper’s” house, which we learned was moved to the property in 1920. It now serves as the lighthouse station’s museum and gift shop.

The 500-meter CAMA Sound Boardwalk east of the lighthouse station leads visitors to sweeping views of Currituck Sound and a long-range glimpse of the lighthouse.

Views of Currituck Beach Lighthouse from boardwalk

Currituck Sound: Past, Present & Future

The Outer Banks Center for Wildlife Education is another exciting attraction located at Currituck Heritage Park. The center is nestled on 29-acres overlooking Currituck Sound. The interpretive center houses a variety of exhibits that chronicle the region’s natural and cultural history. Families will certainly enjoy the 8,000-gallon aquarium and a number of other exhibits which showcase the region’s duck hunting heritage; decoy making culture; and Currituck Sound’s hunting and fishing history. Admission is free to the center and the adjacent grounds, which include a small picnic area.

Other seasonal activities at Currituck Heritage Park include fishing, crabbing, kayaking, treasure hunting and special events. The park is open from dawn to dusk year-round.

Trip Tip #33

 

 

Coming or Going ~ Make sure you stop by Coastal Provisions in Southern Shores for one of the OBX’s most authentic food, wine and beer experiences! Knowledgeable and friendly staff, best selection of oysters on the coast, great food, eclectic market and deli items all rolled up into one mighty fine stop.

Coastal Provisions Oyster Bar & Wine Café

 

 

 

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Spring Outings along the Sound

4 spring outings the Albemarle SoundApril can be one of the best months of the year to enjoy the region. Refreshing weather, fragrant blossoms and seasonal events fill the spring calendar. So get outside, beat the summer crowds and checkout these four spring outings along the Albemarle Sound.

Climb Bodie Island Lighthouse

Lighthouse Climbs and Tours
Cape Hatteras National Seashore
Beginning Friday, April 15

Cape Hatteras National Seashore includes three lighthouses. Two of these are open seasonally for self-guided climbs. The Cape Hatteras Lighthouse and the Bodie Island Lighthouse open their lighthouses beginning the third Friday in April through Columbus Day. Reward yourself after the strenuous climb with the towering views of the sound, surf and sea. Climbing tickets: $8 adults/ $4 senior citizens (62 or older), & children (11 and under, and at least 42″ tall).

 

spring outings easels in the garden

Easels in the Gardens
Edenton, NC
FR & SA (4/15 & 16)

The weekend of “open air” painting includes regional artists’ inspirational works of art in local gardens including the Colonial Revival Gardens surrounding Edenton’s iconic Cupola House. Activities include garden tours, music, food, workshops and art for children. Tickets for the two-day event includes admission to Saturday’s Garden Party, which features food, drink, an art sale and auction. $30 advance/$35 on day’s of the event. More info.

 

spring outings events albemarle sound

OBX Cares
Kill Devil Hills, NC
FR (4/22), 2 – 7pm

The Outer Banks Brew Station and OBX Cares team up for the 3rd Annual Earth Day Celebration and Benefit. OBX CARES is dedicated to the focus of earth-friendly mindfulness and animal rescue in Dare and surrounding counties. Come out and support the OBX Community for Animal Rescue & Earth Sustainability and enjoy live music, food, CARES Beer, pony rides, local art and crafts and a silent auction.

 

spring outings the elizabethan gardensThe Elizabethan Gardens
Manteo, NC
Open Year Round

Seasonal Sensations! The Gardens celebrate their 65th anniversary this year and April is a prime season to tour the gardens. Spring is in full bloom so enjoy a stroll through the Great Lawn and Colony Walk to observe everything from dogwoods and Columbine to roses and azaleas. The Elizabethan Gardens were established to honor the first English colonists in the New World at the site of the original settlement. The 12-acre garden provides cultural and educational opportunities that encourage an appreciation of the art of gardening. Be sure to stop by the gift shop located in the historic gatehouse. The gardens are open year-round, seven days a week. April hours of operation are 9am-5pm. Admission fees: Adult/$9, Youth/$6, Children/$3, Dogs/$3.

things to do along the Albemarle Sound

 

 

 

 

 

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Edenton National Fish Hatchery & Aquarium

Striped Bass at Edenton National Fish Hatchery

NC boasts one of the nation’s best striped bass fisheries

Last week, I spent a leisurely afternoon strolling around the Edenton National Fish Hatchery & Aquarium (ENFH). The facility is operated by the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and serves as one of the oldest in the nation. For more than a century, the Edenton Fish Hatchery has been raising warm water fish for public use and restoration.

Some visitors are surprised to discover that the hatchery includes a small aquarium, which features various aquatic species living in Eastern NC. The aquarium has a number of interesting interpretive displays, a 700-gallon tank and three smaller tanks.

Visitors are also invited to walk around the rearing ponds and enjoy the scenic wetland boardwalk, which overlooks Pembroke Creek. The raised boardwalk is an ideal wildlife observation area. During my tour, I spotted a variety of woodland birds, several species of waterfowl and a Bald Eagle perched in a towering cypress.

Edenton National Fish Hatchery boardwalk

The Edenton National Fish Hatchery plays an important role in our state’s concerted efforts to maintain healthy fish populations in the region’s waters. According to their brochure, the ENFH “produces more than 200,000 striped bass for interjurisdictional restoration each year.” Naturally, fish migrate across various state boundaries and waters. Some of the fish raised and tagged at Edenton have been caught as far away as Cape Hatteras to New England.

From Restoration to Recreation

The hatchery currently provides restoration efforts for American Shad, repopulates or restores fish species impacted by natural or manmade disasters and assists in fishery management to other National Wildlife Refuges in the Carolinas and Virginia.

From a recreational perspective, North Carolina anglers are very appreciative of all of the fish hatchery projects around the Tar Heel State. Results from a 2011 U.S. Fish & Wildlife Participation Survey revealed that 1.5 million NC residents and non-residents fished our state’s waters. And thanks to the ENFH’s historic conservation, preservation and enhancement efforts, they continue to provide great angling opportunities for our region.

The fish hatchery is located at 1102 W. Queen St., Edenton, NC and is open to the public year round, weekdays from 7:00 am – 3:30 pm.

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Bennett’s Millpond

bennettsmillpond

Bennett’s Millpond is one of those places where you can feel a bit of history right up under your feet. In my case, I stumbled upon a piece of its history as I explored the spillway along the earthen dam. One of the gristmill’s original millstones embedded in the leaves caught my foot as I walked along the banks of Rocky Hock Creek. For nearly a hundred years, Bennett’s Millpond was an essential regional industrial resource. It operated as a water-driven corn mill and served as a gathering place for community activities.

millstone at Bennett's Millpond

Original millstone along Rocky Hock Creek

On this crisp February day, the only activity I noticed was a lonely heron feeding along the shallows across the pond. The site has become one of my routine stopovers on a 30-mile cycling route in Chowan County. Earlier in my ride along rural Paradise Road, I saw hundreds of Tundra Swans feeding in fallow fields. I also witnessed a Bald Eagle devouring a deer carcass in a roadside ditch. It was so enthralled with its meal that it appeared unruffled as I cruised within a few feet of the massive bird of prey.

cycling to Bennett's Millpond

Cycling in Edenton and Chowan County has been a great way for me to learn more about the area. Thinking back about the winter avian resident, I reflected on my own migration to the region. My wife and I moved here last spring from the mountains of Western NC. We’re now discovering ourselves immersed into the land, culture and natural history of the Albemarle Sound. Most of our explorations have been self-discovery tours on foot, bike or from the cockpit of a kayak.

The Albemarle Sound Basin encompasses nearly 3,900 square miles of wetlands and large areas of open water in northeastern North Carolina. So when you’re cycling the flat, rural roads of the region, you often observe small streams, open bays and expansive views of the sound.

Bennett’s Millpond Extensions

The ride to Bennett’s Millpond is no exception. Roadsigns with names like Chamber’s Ferry, Emperor Landing and Gum Pond reveal the region’s connection to land and water. Local cyclists refer to this route as the “North of Sound” ride — a 38-mile circuit from downtown Edenton. Some riders include Dillards Mill Road (north of Rocky Hock Rd.) to add another 10 miles to their itinerary. Most of the routes includes low-volume roads, scenic farmland and flat coastal plain terrain.

NC DOT’s Division of Bicycle & Pedestrian Transportation publishes a handy map and route guide entitled Bike Albemarle. Unfortunately, the digital version is no longer available online. The map features 15 loop routes and four connector options. Some include state and local signed routes, extended state routes and sections of national routes including the developing trail system along the East Coast Greenway. Bike shops, campgrounds, visitor’s services and local landmarks such as Bennett’s Millpond are highlighted on the map.

After nearly four decades of adventure travel, backpacking and long distance touring, I’ve refined the ‘art’ of taking a break. Bennett’s Millpond is one of my recommended rest stops and local landmarks while cycling around the sound.

 

Trip Notes: Bennett’s Millpond facilities include a covered pavilion, boardwalk, primitive camping, hiking trail, paddling trail, fishing and the NC Birding Trail. The park is located approximately 6 miles north of Edenton off Hwy 32 at 2100 Rocky Hock Rd.

 

spillway along Bennett's Millpond

 

 

 

 

 

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Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge

tundra swans at Lake Mattamuskeet NWR

waveLINKS birding category

A visit to North Carolina’s largest natural lake has been on my ‘to-do’ list for nearly twenty-five years. I’ve read about the history of the lodge, the world-class birding and wildlife as well as the excellent outdoor recreation options. Last month, my wife and I took a day-trip to Lake Mattamuskeet and we instantly discovered it was well worth the wait.

Mattamuskeet National Wildlife Refuge is located on the Albemarle-Pamlico Peninsula and encompasses 50,180 acres of water, forest, marsh, and open fields. The shallow lake, which averages a depth of only two feet, covers approximately 40,000 acres. The surrounding marshes and woodlands provide habitat, cover and food for more than 200 species of birds. November through January is the prime season for bird watching considering the fact that over 12,000 ducks, geese, swans, herons, bitterns and other waterfowl winter on the refuge’s grounds.

The US Fish & Wildlife Service has a comprehensive conservation and resource management plan for the refuge that includes water management for waterfowl, shorebirds and fisheries; cooperative farming; prescribed burning and deer management with public hunting. Through the preservation of wetlands and habitat, they also protect and conserve migratory birds and other wildlife. Education, interpretation and community partnerships are also vital strategies that the refuge implements. The Annual Wings Over Water Festival in October is a stellar example of how our national wildlife refuges successfully collaborate with local communities.

Great Egret Mattamuskeet NWR

Great Egret observed along the Wildlife Drive

 Seasonal activities

Whether you’re walking or driving, a number of trails, roads and levies provide excellent wildlife viewing opportunities. During the winter, the refuge management restricts access to some roads and levees from November 1 – February 28. However, approximately eight miles of levees and 12 miles of road are open year-round. Boating, canoeing and kayaking are not allowed during the winter. Check with management at the refuge headquarters for additional information about refuge regulations, restricted areas and permitted hunts.

The Hwy 94 causeway, Wildlife Drive and the refuge entrance road offer premier birding opportunities. The observation platform along Hwy 94 affords a panoramic view over the lake. The New Holland Boardwalk Trail along East Canal Drive provides convenient access to a cypress swamp and marshland. Also, there’s a trailhead kiosk, photo blind and benches for photography and observation.

Mattamuskeet Lodge

Mattamuskeet Lodge – originally a pump station

My wife and I took advantage of a beautiful January day and visited the refuge. We enjoyed the exhibits inside the Visitors Center and the grounds adjacent to the Mattamuskeet Lodge. This facility was originally built as a pumping station designed to drain the lake into productive farmland. Eventually, the project proved to be too costly and impractical. Three decades later the U.S. Government acquired the land and the refuge was established in 1934. The lodge and surrounding acres have been transferred to the NC Wildlife Resources Commission. Efforts to secure funding and restore the lodge, which is on the National Register of Historic Places, are currently being planned.

American coots at Mattamuskeet NWR

American Coots – Mattamuskeet NWR

Further adventures

While touring Wildlife Drive, we stopped at several locations to observe Tundra Swans, Great Egrets, Northern Pintails, American Coots and White Ibises probing for food in the shallow waters. Several groups of birders and photographers were lined along the banks taking advantage of the splendid views.

Our first exploration to Lake Mattamuskeet turned out to be a sneak peek but a real treat and a good overview of the refuge, trails, facilities and access points. With spring in the forecast, we plan to return and explore the refuge in our canoe, skiff or on our bikes – maybe all of the above!

map of Mattamuskeet NWR

Map data by ©OpenStreetMap & contributors

Directions: Mattamuskeet NWR is located approximately 70 miles east of Washington in Hyde County, North Carolina. The headquarters entrance road is located off Hwy 94 1.5 miles north of U.S. 264 between Swan Quarter and Engelhard.

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North Carolina Guides to Craft Distillers & Breweries

wavelinkscraftdistillerstrail

Two new guides have recently been published just in time for the holiday season. The publications conveniently package their products into a resourceful map and guide that showcase the Tar Heel State’s craft spirits and brews. One leads the adventurer along a Craft Distillers Trail while the other entices folks with a comprehensive tour of North Carolina’s 181 breweries and 43 craft beer festivals.

North Carolina’s Craft Spirits

No doubt about it, from early colonial days to prohibition North Carolina has always had a rich heritage in the culture of making spirits. But instead of the bootlegging or moonshiner reputation, today’s legal craft distillers are often described as artisans, scientists and entrepreneurs. The state’s recent craft distillery business is beginning to blossom. Across the state, from the mountains of WNC to the Outer Banks, distilleries are creating spirits crafted from family recipes, locally sourced ingredients and lots of l-o-v-e. Some craft spirit enthusiasts refer to the growing trend as the farm-to-flask movement.

Recent NC legislation has made it a tad bit easier for distillers to sell their artisanal spirits on site with some mandated restrictions. The new law enacted October 1 2015, allows distillery permit holders, which offer guided tours, to sell one bottle, per person, per year.

Perfect Timing

About the same time the ABC Ominbus Legislation was passed, The NC Distillers Association and the NC Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services published a free Passport to the state’s Craft Distillers Trail. The handsome “Collector’s Edition” includes a 30-page pocket guide which features a map, an alphabetical listing of all of the distillers and detailed information about each craft distillery. Sticking with the passport theme, patrons can have their passports stamped at each distillery they visit and true to form, “Each seal is unique as its location.”

Our Albermarle Sound neighbors, Outer Banks Distilling are members of the NC Distillers Association and of course, they’re included in the Craft Distillers Trail. The local distillery is located in historic downtown Manteo and they lay claim as the first legal distillery on the Outer Banks. The small batch distillery creates Kill Devil Rum and Buffalo City Rye, which according to the guide are both named after local lore. I’ve personally enjoyed their delicious “molasses to glasses” premium white rum.

Speaking locally, Scott Smith, one of the four owners of Kill Devil Rum recently informed me that their Carolina pecan honey and seasonally spiced rum has hit the shelves at regional ABC stores. The premium dark rum was hand crafted in Manteo with pecans from Manns Harbor and honey from Wanchese. Can’t get more local than that! The seasonal rum can also be purchased at their distillery located at 510 Budleigh St. Come out and support the guys at Kill Devil Rum and pick up a bottle of rum and a copy of the passport. Last time I checked, the distillery was low on the popular passports. Also check for copies at all NC Welcome Centers. Click here for more info.

thegreatN.C.beer map

Photo courtesy of EDIA Maps

The Great N.C. Craft Beer Map

Charlotte-based EDIA Maps published this fun and clever guide in October. It is the brainchild of “map makers and adventure takers” Amanda Fisher and Paul Bright. In their original press release, the cartographers stated that, “The Great N.C. Beer Map provides detailed information on all the craft breweries in the state and can be used as a resource for planning a trip and tracking one’s travels. It is also an educational resource for understanding the art, science, and history of craft brewing.”

Over 200 breweries and beer festivals are featured on the map. Creative sidebars compliment the map and include information about the Science of Ordering, The Wild World of Beer and even an Illustrated History of Beer Games. Sounds like a spendid gift for those who love craft beer and boutique maps. Fisher suggested that The Great N.C. Craft Beer Map is the perfect tool for planning an excursion to various craft breweries in the state. She added, “We wanted to give people an idea of what the brewery experience would be like and what to plan for, while still leaving a few surprises to be discovered.”

Gift one of your friends, family or loved ones this holiday with a unique NC-crafted niche map or poster. Colorful folded maps are available online for $9.99 and unfolded NC beer memorabilia poster versions sell for $29.99. You can also pick up copies at the breweries and various retail locations.

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